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PAYING IT FORWARD

By on January 31, 2016

A couple of years ago, I was included in this blog post by one of the awesome members of my PLN, Janelle McLaughlin. We “met” on Twitter just before the New Year. Realizing that I never actually got around to publishing my responses, I’m opting to modify and update now.

As per Janelle’s post (slightly modified from 11 to 8):
“Here are the rules…
The PLN Blogging Challenge:
  1. Acknowledge the nominating blogger.
  2. Share 8 random facts about yourself.
  3. Answer the 8 questions the nominating blogger has created for you.
  4. List 8 bloggers. They should be bloggers you believe deserve some recognition and a little blogging love!
  5. Post 8 questions for the bloggers you nominate to answer and let all the bloggers know they have been nominated. (You cannot nominate the blogger who nominated you.)

 

8 Random Facts About Me

  1. I go blueberry picking every single year, regardless of where I’m living.
  2. I bake when I’m stressed.
  3. As an 8-year-old, I was the only girl on an all-boys baseball team.
  4. In high school, I was captain of the marching band’s Colorguard.
  5. I’ve seen Toby Lightman in concert at least 5 times.
  6. My first concert was Puddle of Mudd (or was it Blessed Union of Souls??)
  7. My first passport expired before I ever got the guts to travel outside of the country.
  8. I’m a Gemini Water Pig

 

My Questions:
1. What is your favorite part about working in education?
The amount of learning that takes place within every sector of the education industry. It’s nice to have a job where my brain can’t afford to be in “autopilot”.
2. Who is an educator who challenges your thinking, and why?
Brian Aspinall. I would say Aspinall doesn’t necessarily challenge my thinking. Rather, he extends it. I love seeing the ways in which he approaches the teaching of math concepts through the integration of coding. In speaking with him on a Google Hangout last year, I can say that he’s easy to approach, and his envisions on what education should be are so clear that hearing him speak of them makes you feel as though they could actually occur right now! 
3. If you could go anywhere in the world, where would it be?  What would you do there?
Wow. Only one place. It’s a debate between Sydney, Tokyo or Fiji. I’d explore the Great Barrier Reef  if I ever go to Australia, and I’d definitely take in some opera at the Sydney Opera House. In Tokyo, I’d immerse myself in the culture so that I could learn to speak Japanese. In Fiji, I’d bask in the freshness of the water.
4. What one event has shaped you the most as an educator?
As crazy as this may sound, the one event that has shaped me the most has been being an active participant on Twitter. My Twitter PLN has been a major support system throughout all of the professional changes I’ve undergone in the last 5 years. Becoming a Google Certified Innovator, presenting at conferences, connecting my students with other students around the world, making lifelong Edu friends to connect with asynchronously, and most recently, getting my current job at Singapore American School – all of these events and so much more would have likely never happened if I never joined Twitter.
In addition, being connected on Twitter has made attending EdTech Conferences feel more like a reunion, as opposed to a jungle of strangers.
5. Who is your favorite Tweep?
Sarah Thomas. Sarah and I met at an EdCamp a couple of years ago, and have been EduSisters ever since. 
6. If you had to pick one, which would you choose?  Ice cream or pie?
Ice cream. I only say that because having worked at Coldstone Creamery, a long, long time ago, I have quite the knack for making a lot of great ice cream concoctions.
7. What five words best describe where you live?
Humid, Equator, Safe, Rain, Cultural
8. If you could change one thing in education what would it be?
If I could change one thing in education, then it would be to adopt more authentic ways of assessing student learning. Instead of focusing on the end goal, we should take more time to focus on the learning journey. In doing this, we can identify the level of resiliency in students, and help to build up the resiliency in those who may not have any. As someone who took the Driver’s Ed test three times before passing it, I can say that iteration is something that would benefit our students a great deal. Had I stopped trying to pass the Driver’s Ed test after my first failure, then I would have never learned how to drive. We should be instilling values of iteration in our students, so that they become more functional and reflective adults. 
I now nominate the following people to blog their responses to the questions below: Brian Aspinall, Sarah Thomas, Aggie Salter, Josh Gauthier, Demetrius Ball, Dennis Grice, Marc Seigel, Jessica Raleigh
  1. What is your favorite part about working in education?
  2. Who is an educator who challenges your thinking? And why?
  3. If you could go anywhere in the world, where would it be? What would you do there?
  4. What one event has shaped you the most as an educator?
  5. Who is your favorite Tweep?
  6. If you had to pick one, which would you choose? Ice cream or pie?
  7. What five words best describe where you live?
  8. If you could change one thing in education, what would it be?
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